Posts Tagged ‘Hunter Schenck’

You’ve Been Served … Now What?

access_time Posted on: May 31st, 2019

Article by: Hunter Schenck, Esquire Finding out that you have been sued can be scary, daunting, overwhelming, and confusing. Court papers often contain “legalese” which can leave you wondering what to do. This article addresses some litigation basics that will help you know when to contact our office and what to do at the beginning of litigation whether you are an individual or part of a company. If you have just been served you have some time to figure out what to do. Take a breath and read the papers that you’ve received. They should give you an idea of… read more »

Video Surveillance and the Right-to-Know Law

access_time Posted on: February 3rd, 2016

Article by: Hunter B. Schenck Video Surveillance can provide municipalities with security and peace of mind. However, such technology can also create new issues and concerns. Recordings of surveillance footage are subject to the Right-to-Know Law, and municipalities must address requests for video footage. Some video systems might record over previous footage in order to save space. If so, the municipality might need to reference its document retention policy. Municipalities must make sure to preserve any footage while a request is pending if the footage existed at the time of the initial request. If the footage does exist, the municipality… read more »

Act 168:

access_time Posted on: March 9th, 2015

Article by: Hunter Schenck Act 168 of 2014 took effect in December amending the Public School Code of 1949.  The Act adds a section to the Code entitled “Employment History Review” which imposes requirements pertaining to employment involving direct contact with children.  The amendments are designed to require and enable schools and independent contractors to conduct background checks in the interest of protecting children.  This Act affects school entities and independent contractors that are hiring applicants as well as current or previous employers of persons who apply for positions with other entities. The Act defines “direct contact with children” as… read more »