Posts Tagged ‘Hunter Schenck’

The Barstools at the Belmont Theatre

access_time Posted on: April 7th, 2022

A Musical on the Main Stage At The Belmont Theatre. Theme: Back to the Future! April 7-9th, 2022 Thursday through Saturday showtimes at 7:30pm CGA cast members include attorneys John Wilson, Jack Hartman, Ron Perry, Evan Gabel, Hunter Schenck, Brent Diefenderfer, Dan Fennick, Zach Nahass, and, of course, Tom O’Shea. The Bar Stools are always hilarious and 100% of the the proceeds are donated (50% to the York County Bar Foundation and 50% to the Belmont Theatre). Tickets may be purchased HERE.

Litigation Basics: Steps to Take After Being Sued

access_time Posted on: February 16th, 2022

Finding out that you have been sued can be concerning and unnerving. Whether you’re an individual or part of a company, court papers can be confusing and leave you wondering what to do next. This article addresses some basic information relating to litigation to help you know when to contact our office and what to do at the beginning of litigation. If you have just been served, then you have some time to react but deadlines have already begun. Take a breath and read the papers that you’ve received to find out what the lawsuit is about. It could involve… read more »

PA Judgments Must Be Revived

access_time Posted on: December 27th, 2021

A “judgment holder” or “judgment creditor” is the person or entity that obtains a judgment against a “judgment debtor.”  The ultimate goal of many lawsuits is to win a monetary judgment against the other party.   However, the judgment holder might not automatically receive payment once a judgment has been obtained.  In Pennsylvania, there are certain requirements for reviving a judgment in order to ensure that you do not lose your rights as a judgment holder.  A judgment issued by a Magisterial District Justice or MDJ expires after 5 years if nothing is done. A judgment at the county Court… read more »

Can a Corporation or LLC be Pro Se in PA?

access_time Posted on: December 17th, 2021

When someone is pro se, it means that they’re representing themselves in court.  Owners and other officers involved in corporate entities such as corporations, limited liability companies, non-profits, and limited partnerships, may wonder if they can appear in court on behalf of the entity.  The short answer is NO.  At least not after the MDJ level. Rule 207 of the Magisterial District Judges Rules of Civil Procedure allows corporate entities to appear pro se at the MDJ level.  However, that is not the case at the Court of Common Pleas and higher courts with very few exceptions including stockholder’s derivative… read more »

When Can I Get Attorneys’ Fees in Pennsylvania?

access_time Posted on: March 14th, 2020

You are upset and about to file a lawsuit against the person or entity with which you have a problem.  You want them to pay for your attorneys’ fees because it’s all their fault that you’re in this predicament. You are upset because a person or entity just filed a lawsuit against you or your company. This is ridiculous and you want them to pay for your attorneys’ fees because it’s all their fault that you have to defend this suit. Who Pays?  Litigation is often expensive and time consuming whether you’re a plaintiff or a defendant.  I am often… read more »

You’ve Been Served … Now What?

access_time Posted on: May 31st, 2019

Article by: Hunter Schenck, Esquire Finding out that you have been sued can be scary, daunting, overwhelming, and confusing. Court papers often contain “legalese” which can leave you wondering what to do. This article addresses some litigation basics that will help you know when to contact our office and what to do at the beginning of litigation whether you are an individual or part of a company. If you have just been served you have some time to figure out what to do. Take a breath and read the papers that you’ve received. They should give you an idea of… read more »

Video Surveillance and the Right-to-Know Law

access_time Posted on: February 3rd, 2016

Article by: Hunter B. Schenck Video Surveillance can provide municipalities with security and peace of mind. However, such technology can also create new issues and concerns. Recordings of surveillance footage are subject to the Right-to-Know Law, and municipalities must address requests for video footage. Some video systems might record over previous footage in order to save space. If so, the municipality might need to reference its document retention policy. Municipalities must make sure to preserve any footage while a request is pending if the footage existed at the time of the initial request. If the footage does exist, the municipality… read more »

Act 168: Background Checks Added to the Public School Code

access_time Posted on: March 9th, 2015

Article by: Hunter Schenck Act 168 of 2014 took effect in December amending the Public School Code of 1949.  The Act adds a section to the Code entitled “Employment History Review” which imposes requirements pertaining to employment involving direct contact with children.  The amendments are designed to require and enable schools and independent contractors to conduct background checks in the interest of protecting children.  This Act affects school entities and independent contractors that are hiring applicants as well as current or previous employers of persons who apply for positions with other entities. The Act defines “direct contact with children” as… read more »